Monday, 23 May 2005 - 3:00 PM
304

This presentation is part of: Solid State and Materials Chemistry II

Hydrogen Storage on Metal Organic Frameworks

Jeffrey T. Culp, U.S. D.O.E. National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA

The President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative seeks to develop practical and cost-effective hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies needed for a gradual future transition from gasoline to fuel cell vehicles. One major technological hurdle to this goal is the development of safe and efficient methods of hydrogen transport and on-board vehicle storage of hydrogen. On-board storage systems must be compact and reasonably light weight. Targets set for achieving a typical vehicle range of 300 miles will require an on-board hydrogen storage ratio of approximately 6 weight percent or higher. Current technologies being pursued to meet this demand include compressed gas, liquified gas, carbon-based sorbents, metal-hydrides, and most recently, porous metal coordination polymers. While none of these technologies currently meet DOE cost and performance guidelines, porous metal coordination polymers have recently generated a great deal of interest. These ordered metal-organic crystalline materials, akin to the well-known zeolites, can be synthesized from a wide variety of transition metal and organic-linker building blocks to possess pores of different sizes and physical properties. Numerous examples of these materials have appeared in the scientific literature, but reports of their gas storage properties have been much less prevalent. The gas storage properties of several of these structures have been investigated in our laboratory by gravimetric and volumetric techniques at both low temperature and room temperature and up to pressures of 50 atm. The results for these studies will be presented along with discussions concerning the viability of these materials as hydrogen sorbents.

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