257 Joseph Sneddon

Thursday, November 5, 2009: 3:00 PM
Kohlberg (Camino Real Hotel)
Joseph Sneddon , Chemistry, McNeese state University, Lake Charles, LA
J. Craig Moss , Chemistry, McNeese state University, Lake Charles, LA
Joel R. Richert , Chemistry, McNeese state University, Lake Charles, LA
Cary Hardaway , Chemistry, McNeese state University, Lake Charles, LA
Vinuthna Neelam , Chemistry, McNeese state University, Lake Charles, LA
Sekhar Badam , Chemistry, McNeese state University, Lake Charles, LA
Pretap Machavaram , Chemistry, McNeese state University, Lake Charles, LA
Shilpa Vootla , Chemistry, McNeese state University, Lake Charles, LA
Venkate Salla , Chemistry, McNeese state University, Lake Charles, LA
Southwest Louisiana is one of the most productive areas in the continental USA for fishing, both commercial and recreational.  Due to its remoteness and nearness to water in the 1940`s it was chosen as an area for fossil fuel refining and the production of associated petrochemicals.  Approximately fifty different chemical companies are in this area. Due to none or poorly enforced environmental laws, the introduction of both inorganics (metals) and organics occurred.  Since the early 1970` the introduction of pollutants has been strictly controlled.  Nevertheless the possibility of contamination of the seafood and subsequent entry into the food cycle is a real possibility, particularly when dredging occurs in the ship canals.   Several studies of heavy metal pollution in seafood (crabs, crawfish, oysters, etc.) as well as waters, vegetation and soil and sediments are currently in progress.  Results of these studies as well as ongoing projects in the area of phytoremediation of metals in soils from plants native to Southwest Louisiana, and use of discarded crawfish shells for metal uptake will be reported.