128 Photocatalytic Degradation of Algae and Algal Toxins

Wednesday, November 4, 2009: 11:20 AM
Longhorn (Camino Real Hotel)
Zachariah J. Hawkins , Department of Chemistry, Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, TX
Elida G. Arsiaga , Department of Chemistry, Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, TX
Tonia M. Perez , Department of Chemistry, Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, TX
Jonathan M. Carey , Department of Chemistry, Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, TX
Joel E. Boyd, Ph.D. , Department of Chemistry, Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, TX
TiO2 photocatalysis was investigated as a means of inactivating the cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aquae and Microcystis Aeruginosa while degrading their respective toxins, anatoxin-a (ATX) and microcystin-LR (MLR). The experiments utilized coil-shaped acrylic reactors illuminated internally with a single compact fluorescent UV light source . In addition to the acrylic-only control reactors, acrylic-titania composite reactors were constructed with a uniform layer of photocatalytically active titania on the interior surfaces of the reactor.  UV-illuminated acrylic reactors, both with and without photocatalytic enhancement, were shown to be capable of the inactivation of algae.  However, the addition of the titania photocatalyst allowed the degradation of the algal toxins as well, whereas the acrylic-only reactors demonstrated no toxin degradation.  850 mL of 170 ppb ATX was completely degraded within 300 min in the acrylic-titania coil reactors.  850 mL solutions of MLR with initial concentrations of 93 ppb were successfully degraded within 540 min in the acrylic-titania coil reactors.

    

See more of: Undergraduate Research
See more of: Abstract Submission