293 Chemical Reactivity of Self-Assembled Monolayers: Following "Click" Reactions by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

Thursday, November 5, 2009: 10:20 AM
Ballroom C+D (Camino Real Hotel)
Ronald L. Halterman , Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
Lloyd A. Bumm , Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
Daminda H. Dahanayaka , Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
Abhijit B. Biswas , Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
Anuradha Singh , Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
Louis P. Jackson , Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK
Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are flexible substrates for surface chemistry. A wide variety of SAM-surface functionalities can be prepared using alkanethiols with different terminal functional groups. Typically this requires a different alkanethiol for each. Another strategy uses a single alkanethiol to create a reactive surface which can be chemically modified post self-assembly. We are exploring azido-functional monolayers, which are reactive under mild conditions. The best known reaction is the copper catalyzed catalytic 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition with terminal alkynes. This approach has already been demonstrated for general surface chemical modification. We demonstrate molecularly-resolved STM imaging of these SAMs before and after the reaction. The surface structure affects the local reactivity and can be used to direct the reaction at the nanometer scale.