244 Toward An Understanding of the Interaction of Cholesterol with Reverse Micelles by NMR and DLS

Thursday, November 5, 2009: 12:00 PM
Hereford (Camino Real Hotel)
Christopher D. Rithner , Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
Alejandro Trujillo , Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
Bharat Baruah , Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA
Nancy E. Levinger , Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
Debbie C. Crans , Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO
The location and interactions of solutes in microheterogeneous environments, such as reverse micelles, critically influences understanding of many phenomena that utilize probe molecules to characterize properties in chemical, biological and physical systems. The information gained in such studies depends substantially on the location of the probe used. Often, intuition leads to the assumption that ionic probe molecules reside in the polar water pool of a system and that non-polar molecules, such as cholesterol, are embedded in the non-polar boundary layers. In this work, the location of cholesterol in a reverse micellar system is determined using NMR spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering, DLS. The results challenge some of the assumption made and suggest that probe molecule location be carefully considered before interpreting data from similar systems.