291 Fullerene Incorporation in Phospholipid Membrane Assemblies

Thursday, November 5, 2009: 9:40 AM
Ballroom C+D (Camino Real Hotel)
Gabriel Montano, Ph.D. , Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM
Jessica R. McCoury, B.S. , Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM
Matthew Goertz, Ph.D. , Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM
Rashi Iyer, Ph.D. , Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM
Hsing-Lin Wang , Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM
Andrew P. Shreve , Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM
Fullerenes have received much attention for their potential biological effects, both beneficial and harmful. However, much of the research investigating fullerene effects on cells and cellular viability has been inconclusive and in some cases contradictory from study to study. It is therefore necessary to develop methods to mechanistically investigate interactions of fullerenes and other nanoparticles with cells and cellular components. Cellular lipid membranes represent the physical barrier between the cell and the external environment, and thus the point of interaction of foreign particles, such as fullerenes, with the cell. In this study, we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the interaction of a systematically functionalized series of fullerenes with lipid bilayer assemblies (LBA) of various compositions. Fluorescence quenching of dye-labeled liposomes by fullerenes was also used to indicate interaction and location of fullerenes with liposomes in solution. Results indicate that particle size plays the largest role in determining interaction of fullerenes with phospholipid membranes, however, the level and mechanism of interaction is tuned by functionality. LBAs with fullerenes also exhibit an enhanced sensitivity to UV light indicating potential harmful effects as a result of fullerene exposure. Results suggest various mechanisms in which fullerenes may interact with membrane architectures and elicit various responses. Results were evaluated as a function of fullerene physical, chemical and electrical properties, providing evidence toward developing predictive models for biological effects of nanomaterials.