Tuesday, 24 May 2005 - 3:35 PM
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This presentation is part of: College Student Award Symposium sponsored by the Chromatography Forum of Delaware Valley

Chiral Separations in Microemulsion Electrokinetic Chromatography (MEEKC) Utilizing a Chiral Surfactant and Chiral Co-Surfactant

Kimberly A. Kahle and Joe P. Foley. Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA

As more commercial products contain chiral compounds, in particular pharmaceuticals, the demand for chiral separation methods increases. The importance of enantiomer separation stems from the fact that the effectiveness of many drug formulations is due to only one of the enantiomers with the other enantiomer being ineffective or possibly toxic. Electrokinetic chromatography (EKC) has been shown to easily separate numerous pairs of enantiomers. Some of the advantages of EKC for this application include high efficiencies, short analysis times, miniscule sample and solvent consumption, and the availability of a wide variety of chiral recognition agents. Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) is one of the less developed avenues of EKC. In this technique, a pseudostationary phase consisting of a surfactant, co-surfactant, and oil core is employed for separations. To date, only three types of chiral microemulsions have been described in the literature using either a chiral oil, surfactant, or co-surfactant. This study explores the combination of a chiral surfactant and a chiral co-surfactant for the separation of chiral pharmaceutical compounds.

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