Tuesday, 24 May 2005 - 4:00 PM
603

This presentation is part of: College Student Award Symposium sponsored by the Chromatography Forum of Delaware Valley

Separation of Metals from Water using Collagen Dispersion

Christopher S. Cohen, Widener University, Chester, PA

This paper discusses a new process for separating metals from water, which will produce a minimal amount of waste capable of being disposed into the environment without causing harm. Researchers at Widener University have discovered that high surface area collagen fibrils (HSC) have the ability to retain up to 500 times their mass in water. The mixture of collagen fibrils, organic acid and water is called a collagen dispersion. By adjusting the pH of the dispersion, the system can be made to become bi-phasic. That is, two aqueous phases exist one rich in collagen (opaque) and the other being clear water. Contaminates contained in the water will distribute between the phases. Collagen dispersion will be added to several samples of water each spiked with a known concentration of a metal. The pH of this mixture will be adjusted and then will either be centrifuged or filtered to separate the metal absorbed in the collagen from the water. The processed water will be tested using atomic absorption to determine the concentration of metal separated from each water sample.

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